Martin Gardner was famously known for giving reply to almost all who contacted him, and keeping a close correspondence with many. Over the years he became friends with many who played an important role and informed his work, as he influenced theirs, this network of people is known as Martin Gardner’s Mathematical Grapevine. This page aims to credit some of these people, within our community. The list is by no means complete and will continue being added to dynamically.

If someone is absent you feel should definitely figure please email us at support@g4gfoundation.org

Tom Rogers

G4G Founder

Gathering 4 Gardner (G4G) was envisioned by Thomas M Rodgers to bring together magicians, mathematicians, skeptics, philosophers, puzzle enthusiasts, and the general public, all united by a shared enthusiasm for the work of Martin Gardner.

Tom Rodgers & John Railing
Tom Rodgers gestures while John Railing listens.

Martin Gardner’s influence was so broad that a large percentage of his fans had only infrequent contact with each other. Tom Rodgers conceived the idea of hosting a weekend gathering in honor of Gardner to bring some of these people together.

In 2012, Tom Rodgers passed away just after the G4G10 conference. His dedication to Gathering 4 Gardner and promoting Martin Gardner’s legacy will be greatly missed.

MAA – Article About Tom Rodgers 

Elwyn Berlekamp

Elwyn Berlekamp promoted the idea of the Gathering 4 Gardner, among mathematicians being a regular Gathering 4 Gardner attendant, even through video in his impossibility of attendance, until his passing on April 9, 2019. His kind and inviting and ever critical spirit has been missed since his passing.

Remembering Elwyn

Elwyn’s personal site with multiple resources for all depths of knowledge Article of the Wallstreet Journal on Elwyn

Mark Setteducati

Mark Setteducati co-founded the Gathering 4 Gardner with Rogers and Berlekamp. He served as president of the G4G board from 2012 until passing on the responsibility to Nancy Blachman, continuing as advisory. He has been one of the people behind the Magic of the G4Gn meetings and a constant attendee.

Mark’s Personal Page

Interview on INVENTORS | PBS Digital Studios

Richard Guy

Richard’s were the words that portrayed Martin Gardner as the one who “[…] brought more math to more millions than anyone else“. As Martin Gardner put it, together with Elwyn Berlekamp and John Conway, produced the “[…] greatest contribution to recreational mathematics in this century [XX], a two-volume work called Winning Ways.

Richard has been a regular G4G attendant. In the G4G community he also became quite famous for both climbing stairs and riding the Marta (the Atlanta Subway) from the airport to the G4G venue, on his own, at every Gathering (this considering he was born in 1916).

Celebrating 100

London Mathematical Society 100th birthday News

John Conway

Gardner brought to a wide audience several hard theorems and mathematical constructions and framing them in such way that anyone could access them, promoting the thinkers behind these ideas as well. Conway was one of these people. His extensive work becoming popular to a point where Gardner’s Article on the Game of Life became the most read article. He has been a featured presenter and attendee of the G4G conferences.

The Guardian Article on Conway

A Life in Games, WIRED article on Conway

Scott Kim

His first puzzles appeared in Scientific American in Martin Gardner’s Mathematical Games column. It would mark a beginning in his over 20 year long career in designing perplexing and thought provoking puzzles, ambigrams and every G4Gn Logo since it’s start.

Scott’s TED Talks

Raymond Smullyan

Raymond Smullyan, was a professional magician in his youth. He created several puzzles that looked innocent but were theoretically relevant. He featured on many television shows and is widely known for his multiple published works that bring heavy and abstract logic structures close to everyone.

He was a regular Gathering 4 Gardner attendant until his passing in February 6, 2017. His thought provoking assertions and warm nature are greatly missed.

Remembering Raymond

New York Times Article about the life of Raymond Smullyan

Math History Article About Smullyan

Scientific American Article about Raymond Smullyan